How to tell your boss you’re quitting

Simple resignation letter sampleLeaving a job can be a difficult decision, but it is often necessary for personal or professional reasons. When you are ready to quit your job, it is important to do so in a respectful and professional manner. 

How to tell your boss you’re quitting

Introduction

There’s no easy way to tell your boss that you’re leaving. You might be angry, embarrassed and afraid that he’ll think badly of you. But if you’re ready for the challenge, there are some things you can do to prepare yourself for the conversation ahead:

First, think about how you want to tell your boss you’re leaving.

How you tell your boss you’re leaving depends on a lot of factors, including the nature of your relationship with them. If it’s a good one and they’ve been supportive of your efforts, then by all means tell them in person. But if things aren’t going so well lately—if there’s been tension between the two of you or there are other issues at work—you might want to do some extra research before making yourself vulnerable once again (and potentially embarrassed) with an in-person conversation. If this is the situation you find yourself in, then a letter would be a much better option, giving you time to think about exactly what you want to say without worrying about being put on the spot by questions you weren’t expecting.

The circumstances surrounding your resignation will also affect how much notice is required by the company. Most companies will have a notice period set out in the Company Handbook or you could find it on the Intranet or through the HR department. If you are leaving a job that is covered by a contract, or if you have been employed at the same company for several years, then you might be required to give longer than that specified in the Handbook. If this is the case, then it’s best to have your resignation letter sent out as soon as possible so that there aren’t any legal complications down the line. However, if you had an agreement with your employer specifying how much notice they would need to receive before your departure—or if they were relying on you to finish a project within a specific timeframe—then failing to give them proper notice could be grounds for legal action.

Write a letter of resignation.

  • Write a letter of resignation. This is your chance to tell them why you’re leaving, and to thank them for the opportunity. Make sure it’s written professionally, and make sure that it’s printed out so there’s no question about what kind of person you are.
  • Offer to help with your replacement! You’ll want to be sure that whoever replaces you knows what they’re doing before handing over the reins—and if possible, this should be someone who shares some of your values or has some familiarity with company culture (which could mean reaching out again after quitting).

Once you’ve written your letter, review it carefully and make sure it’s perfect.

  • Make sure the date on which you’re quitting matches your employment agreement. If not, this could result in a delay in payment or loss of benefits as well as legal action against you by the company.
  • Make sure that there are no typos or errors in handwriting (this is especially important if you plan to send a copy by mail).
  • Ensure that all addresses are correct—including the address for where they should forward any correspondence from themselves to prevent delays in delivery.

Read the company’s policy handbook or manual so you know what to expect on your last day.

You’ll want to know what the company’s policy is for last-day departures. The handbook or manual should give you an idea of what they expect from employees, their pay and benefits, as well as how to get your final paycheck and any other relevant information.

If there are no clear guidelines in the handbook or manual about what happens when someone quits their job at a certain time (e.g., “You must finish working by 6 p.m.”, “Your badge will be deactivated”), then it may be best for both parties involved if they simply part ways amicably without any drama over who gets which items from each other’s desks or lockers—especially if those items are important ones like keys or parking passes!

As long as you are professional and use tact, quitting your job can help you learn important skills without hurting your reputation.

  • Be prepared for the reaction of your boss. If they aren’t happy with your decision to leave, it’s best not to make their feelings worse by going into detail about what happened or why. Just say something like “I’ve decided this is the right time for me,” and then move on to other topics. If they insist on knowing why you’re leaving, be honest and brief. You don’t have to tell them the whole story (unless it’s in your contract), you can just say that the job wasn’t what you expected and that you want to try something new.
  • If you have a good relationship with your boss, it’s a good idea to have a frank discussion about what led up to this decision. This will help clear the air and prevent any misunderstandings in the future. You may even be able to come up with some solutions or compromises that might benefit both of you.

Conclusion

When you write a letter of resignation to your current employer, make the letter as matter of fact as possible. Whatever your reason for leaving, thank them for your time at the company and find one nice thing to say about working there. Your new employer may not yet have taken up references and a nice resignation letter makes sure you don’t jeopardise your chances of getting one. Now is not the time to settle grudges or complain about perceived wrongdoings against you.

it is important to put your resignation in writing. This will serve as documentation of your notice to leave the company. It is also professional courtesy to provide your employer with a written resignation letter.

Letter of resignation  – sample 1

Dear [Employer Name],

I am writing to inform you that I am resigning from my position as [position title] at [company name]. This decision was not made lightly, but I have decided that it is time for me to move on to new opportunities.

I would like to thank you for the opportunity to work at this company. I have learned a lot during my time here and I am grateful for the experience.

Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help with the transition in the coming weeks. I will be available until [date] if you need any assistance.

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

Letter of resignation  – sample 2

Dear [Employer]

I would like to inform you that I am resigning from my position as [position] with the company. This was not an easy decision for me, but I believe it is the best decision for my personal and professional growth.

Thank you for the opportunity to work at this company. I have learned a great deal during my time here, and I will always appreciate the experience.

Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help transition my duties to another employee.

I hope all is well and that we can stay in touch.

Sincerely,

[Your name]

Letter of resignation  – sample 3

Dear [name]

I write to formally tender my resignation from my position of [position] and will be leaving on [date] which is giving the required period of notice.

Throughout the period of my employment with [Company Name),I have found the terms of my employment to be extremely favourable and would have no hesitation in recommending you as a good  [great/supportive] employer.

I wish [the Company] continued success in the future and thank you for the opportunity I had to further my skills during my time working for you.

Yours Sincerely,

[Name]

Letter of resignation  – sample 4

Dear [Employer]

I am writing to inform you that I am resigning from my position as [position] at [company]. This decision was not made lightly, but I believe it is in my best interest to move on at this time.

I would like to express my sincere gratitude for the opportunity to work at [company]. I have gained valuable experience and skills during my time here, and I will always cherish the memories I have made with my colleagues.

Please accept this letter as formal notice of my resignation, effective [date]. If there is anything I can do to help during this transition, please do not hesitate to let me know.

Thank you for your understanding and support.

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

Letter of resignation  – sample 5

Dear [name]

I write to formally tender my resignation from my position of [position] and as I am required to give [amount of time] notice, I intend to leave on [date].

I have really enjoyed my time working with you and I would like to thank you for your support and help during my time working for [Company Name] it is much appreciated. My work colleagues have also always made me feel a valued member of the team.

I wish you success in the future and hope to keep in touch.

Yours Sincerely,

[Name]

Quitting your job can be a stressful experience. However, by following these tips, you can ensure that you resign in a professional and respectful manner. By doing so, you will leave your current position on good terms and set yourself up for success in your next venture.